Advanced Marketing Communication

Study Board of Business Economics

Teaching language: English
EKA: B150026112, B150026102
Censorship: Second examiner: None
Grading: 7-point grading scale
Offered in: Odense
Offered in: Autumn
Level: Master

Course ID: B150026101
ECTS value: 10

Date of Approval: 02-03-2018


Duration: 1 semester

Course ID

B150026101

Course Title

Advanced Marketing Communication

Teaching language

English

ECTS value

10

Responsible study board

Study Board of Business Economics

Date of Approval

02-03-2018

Course Responsible

Name Email Department
Gry Høngsmark Knudsen gryh@sam.sdu.dk

Offered in

Odense

Level

Master

Offered in

Autumn

Duration

1 semester

Mandatory prerequisites

None.

Recommended prerequisites

Students are expected to have knowledge on theories and practices of marketing communications and advertising management, equivalent to the contents of the course “Markedskommunikation & reklame” on the bachelor programme in Economics and Business Administration.


See for example Percy and Rosenbaum-Elliott (2012) Strategic Advertising Management or  De Pelsmacker et al (2013) Marketing Communications, a European Perspective that are textbooks indicative of the expected prior knowledge.

Aim and purpose

Marketing communications, both as a pragmatic and academic field, is facing new challenges from several directions. Traditional forms of marketing communications such as advertising are under pressure as it seems that the impact of advertising is decreasing in general (as conventional effects measures).



Even though the ‘tools’ and rationale of marketing communication has been adopted in many other fields, Marketing Communication still needs renewed legitimacy, and accordingly it is important to take a reflexive and critical look at the field of Marketing Communication, investigating its classical discourses in the light of new contexts and media, and also examining ‘new’ discourses within the field such as neuromarketing, apps and ‘social media’, and ‘old’ reinvented forms such as placements, AFP, branded content, cause related-, and social marketing.



The aim and purpose of this course is to provide students with a reflexive understanding of marketing communication. Advanced Marketing Communication aims to qualify the students with competences to reflexively manage communication primarily in market contexts, with state-of-the-art knowledge of theory and skills in application of the theories for analysis of a specific issue. Further, it is the aim that the student acquires skills to identify areas with need fordevelopment within the field, and the ability to evaluate and appropriate new academic and pragmatic research.


As such, this course is complementing the courses Corporate Communication and Advanced Brand Management.

Content

Overarching question to frame the content is:



How is current Marketing Communication conceived, performed and received by advertisers, managers, scholars and consumers/cititizens/stakeholders?



The content and themes are a mixture of state-of-the-art issues and critical examination of classical theories and practices within the broad field of marketing communication.



For example:


  • Digital marketing strategies
  • Integrated marketing communication
  • Response & persuation theory, e.g.ELM/ELAM, mere exposure, lo-inv. processing)

  • Rhetorical advertising theory
  • Marketing communication and attention economics
  • Branded content, placement, adver-gaming, apps

  • Marketing communication and social media, remediation of MC, viral and WOM

  • Theories of ‘postmodern’ advertising and contexts (or other sociological contextualization)

  • Communication ethics (intrusion/obtrusiveness, privacy, placement, fairness-issues)
  • The examples mentioned above are subject to continued evaluation, and is not a complete or exhaustive list.

Learning goals

Students are expected to be able to demonstrate knowledge in the form of clear and concise application of the central concepts, theories and practical challenges of marketing communication as presented in the course. They must be able to define, illustrate, identify, discuss and critique the underlying assumptions of the competing theories of marketing communication and the related theoretical fields (as presented in the course curriculum).


In addition, students are expected to demonstrate skills in researching an issue relevant for the challenges of marketing communication and communicate the findings in a written form of academic prose with a reflexive and nuanced discourse, adhering to scientific standards.



These goals can be summarized as the student’s ability to, for a specific emperical marketing context:


  • clearly state the marketing communication problem and its relevance and delimitations
  • demonstrate an academic and methodological approach to explain and analyze the problem

  • account for, justify, and discuss chosen scientific literature relevant to the problem

  • reflect upon, and appraise the assumptions of the theories and of the analysis of the problem

  • suggest and discuss the implications for management and research with precise and nuanced argumentation

  • communicate the results in a well-structured independent academic paper adhering to academic standards.

Literature

A compendium consisting of journal articles and book chapters.


Examples:

  • Jenkins, H., Ford, S. & Green, S. (2013) Spreadable Media, University of New York Press.

  • Lien, Mariannne Elisabeth (2003) Fame and the Ordinary: “Authentic” Constructions of Convenience Food, in Advertising Cultures, (eds.) Malefyt & Moeran, 165-186

  • McQuarrie Phillips (2008) Go Figure, New Directions in Advertising Rhetoric. M.E. Sharpe. (excerpts)

  • McQuarrie Phillips (2010) Narrative and Persuasion in Fashion Advertising, Journal of Consumer Research, 37 (3)

  • Frith, J. (2013). Turning life into a game: Foursquare, gamification, and personal mobility. Mobile Media & Communication. 1(2), 248-262.

  • Gershon, Richard A. (2013) Digital Media Innovation and the Apple Ipad: Three Perspectives on the Future of Computer Tablets and News Delivery. Journal of Media Business Studies 10 (1), pp. 41-61

  • Rydén, P., Ringberg, T., & Wilke, R. (2015). How Managers' Shared Mental Models of Business-Customer Interactions Create Different Sensemaking of Social Media. Journal of interactive marketing, 31, 1-16
  • Kozinets, R. V., de Valck, K., Wojnicki, A. C., & Wilner, S. J. S. (2010). Networked Narratives: Understanding Word-of-Mouth Marketing in Online Communities. Journal of Marketing, 74(2), 71-89

Please note: the final syllabus is not the above, but is indicative of the contents of the course.

Teaching Method

At the end of the course, the student must be able to produce an academic paper demonstrating to which extent the student meets the learning goal by analysis of a marketing communication problem. To support the student in reaching the goals, the learning activities for the course consist of a series of workshop activities with exercises on issues related to their self-selected marketing communication problem. The workshops thus give the students material and feedback which forms the foundation for writing an academic paper in which the student can demonstrate to which extent he or she meets the learning goals (a term paper). Active pariticpation in workshop activites is part of the final grade.


The workshops are organized along a series of portfolio assignments. Workshop exercises, written exercises such as project focus, problem statement, method, literature and structure of the final report, and presentations. There is no extended individual supervision outside of interactive workshops.

The course use e-learning tools for communication, portfolio work and feedback.

Workload

Scheduled classes:
6 weeks of 3 hour lectures alternating with 9 weeks of workshop activities and guest lectures.

___

The workload of the course is, on average, distributed as follows:
Lecture: 18 hours.
Workshops: 27 hours.
Preparation for lectures: 68 hours.
Preparation for interactive workshops including portfolio work and feedback: 102 hours.
Preparation and final writing of term paper: 55 hours.
Total: 270 hours.

Examination regulations

Exam - Portfolio

Name

Exam - Portfolio

Timing

Exam: During the semester. Information on deadline for hand-in will be stated in the exam plan.
Reexam: During the semester. Information on deadline for hand-in will be stated in the exam plan.

The form of the reexam is subject to change.

Tests

Exam - Portfolio

Name

Exam - Portfolio

Form of examination

Portfolio

Censorship

Second examiner: None

Grading

7-point grading scale

Identification

Student Identification Card - Date of birth

Language

English

Preparation

102 hours.

Duration

The portfolio assignments must be completed as described below during the semester by the deadlines stipulated in the exam plan.

Length

See specification under Additional information.

Examination aids

All exam aids allowed. 

Assignment handover

-

Assignment handin

In SDUAssignment in the course page in Blackboard.

ECTS value

2.5

Additional information

The portfolio assignments must be completed as described below during the semester by the deadlines stipulated in the exam plan. The teacher/supervisor can grant extension of the deadline for submission provided there is a reasonable cause. 

Requirements for portfolio assignments:

The portfolio consists of the following:

An oral presentation, 5 drafts relating to the final paper, and 2 workshop exercises.
All parts have about equal weight in the grading. A missing part results in the grade – 3 for that part. 

* Oral presentation:
Oral presentation including a powerpoint presentation. The oral presentation must be given in person

* 5 drafts relating to the final paper:
Description of a marketing communication problem and its relevance (topic of the final paper) max 1 page.
Problem statement max 1 page.
Method max 2 pages.
Annotated bibliography max 2 pages (but min. 8 references, of which 5 must be from the syllabus).
Argument structure of the project max 1 page.

* 2 workshop exercises:
2 written summaries of workshop exercises.

____

Grade for the course is awarded based on an overall evaluation of the portfolio and the written report. In the evaluation, the portfolio has an indicative weight of 25% and the written report 75%. It is only possible to pass the course if the portfolio as well as the report is submitted. 

The report and the portfolio can be done individually or in groups of 2 or 3 students. It must be clear from the report for which elements each student has been responsible to ensure that each student is graded on his or her individual effort. Introduction and conclusion may be joint chapters.

EKA

B150026112

Exam - Written report

Name

Exam - Written report

Timing

Exam: January
Reexam: February

The form of the reexam is subject to change.

Rules

-3 is not allowed

Tests

Exam

Name

Exam

Form of examination

Project report

Censorship

Second examiner: None

Grading

7-point grading scale

Identification

Student Identification Card - Date of birth

Language

English

Duration

Date for submission will appear from the examination plan.

Length

If portfolio is incomplete, the final exam paper is 15 pages pr. student.

In the case of complete portfolio, the terms papers are:
1 student: Max 10 pages
2 students: max. 20 pages.
3 students: max. 30 pages.

Examination aids

All exam aids allowed.

Assignment handin

Via SDU-assignment in the course page in Blackboard.

ECTS value

7.5

Additional information

The written report must be in the form of an analysis of an advanced marketing communication problem selected by the student or a group of students and approved by the lecturer.

Home assignment.

Internet Access: Necessary.

____

Supplemental information about reexam:

Reexam is in the form of an individual written report of 15 pages plus the completed portfolio. Requirements as described above. For the re-examination, there will be no feedback on the assignments submitted to the portfolio. The oral presentation has to be given as a video presentation including a powerpoint, and both must be included in the portfolio submitted.

____

Grade for the course is awarded based on an overall evaluation of the portfolio and the written report. In the evaluation, the portfolio has an indicative weight of 25% and the written report 75%. It is only possible to pass the course if the portfolio as well as the report is submitted. 

The report and the portfolio can be done individually or in groups of 2 or 3 students. It must be clear from the report for which elements each student has been responsible to ensure that each student is graded on his or her individual effort. Introduction and conclusion may be joint chapters.

EKA

B150026102

External comment

NOTE - This course is identical with the former course 8033101 Advanced Marketing Communication.
Used examination attempts in the former identical course will be transferred.
Courses that are identical with former courses that are passed according to applied rules cannot be retaken.

The student is automatically registered for the first examination attempt when the student is registered for a course or course element with which one or more examinations are associated. Withdrawal of registration is not possible, and students who fail to participate in an examination have used one examination attempt, unless the University has made an exemption due to special circumstances. 
If a student does not meet the established university prerequisites for taking the exam, he or she has used one examination attempt, unless the University has made an exemption due to special circumstances.

Courses offered

Period Offer type Profile Programme Semester

Teachers

Name Email Department City
Gry Høngsmark Knudsen gryh@sam.sdu.dk Odense